/ Central St. Martins’ B.A. Jewellery Design (2016)

Haya Jahangir Lutfullah
Inspired by Eastern classical music, the hammered texture of Haya’s jewellery is created by punching copper to the beat of the tabla, a drum commonly heard in Eastern music, infusing the pieces with the rhythm of the music. The stain of the copper on skin, symbolises the lasting impression music can make on our bodies while the use of flowing lines and circular shapes create the impression of a melody which overlays the rhythmic drum.

haya hutfullah

Elizabeth Martin
Elizabeth’s collection is made up of images depicting large, sculptural body pieces which abstract the human body through the use of photography. Flexible and synthetic materials which distort and refract light are used in order to facilitate the wearing of light and to explore how that luminosity appears in photographs. By combining 3D and 2D forms and layering images on top of each other, Elizabeth’s work creates an ephemeral and poetic effect.

Elizabeth Martin

Yana Istomina
Inspired by the changes that aging causes to the skin, the shape of the body and the mixed feelings that these changes can provoke, Yana has created a provocative collection which features nude and black leather body pieces, laser cut with abstract interpretations of wrinkled skin. By transforming the aging body into decorative jewellery pieces of metaphorical wrinkles, Yana’s innovative work blurs the line between biological fate and performative agency.

Yana Istomina

Farah Mohidin
Hair loss in women is a sensitive and intimate topic. Farah’s pieces reflect her complex range of emotions felt in response to experiencing alopecia. From the initial mourning of her hair loss to the possibility of acceptance and celebration of perceived imperfections, Farah’s pieces act as a reflection on each stage of hair loss to create a collection which addresses an underrepresented and stigmatised topic with care and courage.

Farah Mohidin

Tia Liang
Made from materials such as porcelain, wood and silver, Tia’s pieces are primarily based on the form of the Chinese rice bowl, removing it from its use as household item and rescaling it to create simple and striking pieces. Tia’s collection places delicate pearls alongside the rice bowls, combining symbols of wealth and power with empty vessels in a collection which explores shame as a postive and universal experience.

Tia